Horses at the window

Horses at the window, Matei Vișnec

Translation: Gulyás Ferenc-Tapasztó Ernő

Co-production of Aradi Kamaraszínház Theatre Company and Three Theatre Pecs, Hungary
This play was presented during the events hosted by Pecs European Capital of Culture 2010



Mother, doughter, Wife: Bacskó Tünde
Father, Son, Husband: Harsányi Attila
Messenger: Tapasztó Ernő   

Settings and Costumes: Radu Dinulescu
Stage-manager: Gheorghe Mureşan
Lights: Ioan Horga
Sound: Gheorghe Mureşan

Director: Radu Dinulescu

Premiere: Arad, the 18th of August 2010



Awards and distinctions:


2010

- Harsányi Attila-special award offered by the „League for Theatre”  Foundation
at the International ATELIER Theatre Festival, 18th edition
- Bacskó Tünde: nominated for best actress - leading role
at the International ATELIER Theatre Festival, 18th edition
- Harsányi Attila: nominated for best actor - leading role
at the International ATELIER Theatre Festival, 18th edition
- Radu Dinulescu: nominated for best director 
at the International ATELIER Theatre Festival, 18th edition


Festivals and Tours:


2010

Pecs 2010European Capital of Culture, within the programme „City without borders - Theatre without borders”
18th edition of the International Theatre Festival ATELIER, Baia Mare
20th edition of the International Theatre Festival THEALTER, Szeged, Hungary, supported by the Romanian Cultural Institute - Budapest
22nd editon of Festival of Hungarian Theatres Abroad, Kisvárda, Hungary
Zsámbék Theatre Base - supported by the Romanian Cultural Institute - Budapest


2009

Pecs2010 European Capital of Culture, within the programme „City without borders - Theatre without borders”
DraMa Contemporary Theatre Festival, 2nd edition, Odorheiu Secuiesc

Other locations: Békéscsaba


An absurdist journey through three centuries of war and destruction: It’s 1699.  A Son leaves his anxious Mother to go off to war.  His Mother is informed of his mysterious death by a mysterious Messenger bearing red carnations.  It’s 1745.  A Father, in a wheel-chair, and his Daughter banter bitterly, in the same kitchen.  The Father goes off to his bedroom and the mysterious Messenger appears, again with red carnations, to inform her that her Father has gone mad fighting in battle.  It’s 1815.  In the same kitchen, a Husband/Soldier is dressing for battle as the Wife prepares the table for a sumptuous meal as he recreates the battle on the dining room table and rushes off to the war.  The same Messenger arrives, carnations in hand, to report his death by trampling.  As he recounts the waste of the Husband leading his soldiers to battle and then trampled to death by them in their fervor, a rain of boots fall on the Wife and ever-returning Messenger, who reveals he is the ever-dying soldier.